Macula OCT

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) macula scan, with color added to highlight retinal neural and supporting layers. Courtesy of Silverstein lab

Unthresholded z-normalized activation differences (illusory – fragmented) as compared to those that were predicted via ActFlow using resting state.

The left panel shows cortical modulations during a visual perceptual organization task; the right panel shows modulations that were predicted from resting-state functional connectivity and brain activity flow mapping (Keane et al., 2021, Neuroimage). Courtesy of Keane lab

visual proprioceptive integration experiment

Yacinda Hernandez (C), a senior psychology major at City College New York works with BCS graduate students Ying Lin, left and Emily Isenstein on an experiment accessing visual proprioceptive integration in Meliora Hall. Courtesy of J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester

3D visualization: Optic disk cube

OCT macula cube image showing neural layers from the inner limiting membrane (top) to the retinal pigment epithelium (bottom). Courtesy of Silverstein lab

Reflectance (left) and two-photon excited fluorescence (right) image of the photoreceptor mosaic in the living macaque eye.

Reflectance (left) and two-photon excited fluorescence (right) image of the photoreceptor mosaic in the living macaque eye. The main source of fluorescence is most likely all-trans-retinol. Courtesy of ARIA

River Campus Aerial View

Courtesy of J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester

AngioPlex retina depth encoded

Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) image of the superficial retinal vascular layer, centered on the foveal avascular zone and showing the surrounding microvasculature. Courtesy of Silverstein lab

Ex vivo two-photon microscopy image of ganglion cells

Ex vivo two-photon microscopy image of ganglion cells below the nerve fiber layer. Courtesy of ARIA

soldering practice with Manny Gomez-Ramirez

Lulu Abdullahi (L), a junior at East High, practices soldering to repair an experiment component with Manuel Gomez-Ramirez, an Assistant Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, in the Haptics Lab in Meliora Hall. Courtesy of J. Adam Fenster / University of Rochester

Confocal image of the labeled mitochondrial network inside a corneal fibrobast in culture

Confocal image of the labeled mitochondrial network inside a corneal fibrobast in culture. Courtesy of Huxlin lab (Ankita Kumar)

Center for Visual Science

The Center for Visual Science (CVS) is an interdepartmental program that brings together vision scientists at the University of Rochester. We are united by a shared conviction that the visual system can only be understood by the coordinated effort of diverse scientists focusing on different parts of the problem.

The expertise of CVS faculty spans psychophysical, optical, physiological, computational, anatomical, and clinical approaches to visual science. The role of the center is to integrate these approaches into a coordinated research effort. Over 35 participating investigators hold their primary appointments in one of seven departments: biomedical engineeringbrain and cognitive sciences, the Flaum Eye Institute, neurology, neuroscience, the Institute of Optics, or Psychiatry. We are clustered in two main locations--the School of Medicine and Dentistry and Arts, Sciences, and Engineering. Vision research at Rochester falls within five major themes.